print_label | resize_label

Metastatic (Stage IV) Breast Cancer Glossary

AZ
AZ

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

A

Adjuvant therapy: Additional cancer treatment given after the primary treatment to lower the risk that the cancer will come back. Adjuvant therapy may include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormonal therapy, targeted therapy, or biological therapy.

Antiestrogen: Medication that is used to treat breast cancers that depend on estrogen for growth.

C

Chemotherapy: Treatment with drugs that attack and kill rapidly growing cancer cells and some normal cells.

Clinical trial: A medical study that tests the safety and effectiveness of a drug or intervention in people.

D

De novo: The first occurrence of cancer found.

E

Estrogen: A female hormone; one of the hormones that can help some breast cancer tumors grow.

Estrogen receptor: A protein associated with cells. The hormone estrogen will bind to the receptors inside the cells and may cause the cells to grow.

H

Hormonal treatment (therapy): In breast cancer, using drugs to block the effects or production of estrogen.

Hormone receptor positive: Refers to cells that have a receptor for estrogen or progesterone. Cancer cells that are hormone receptor-positive can grow when estrogen or progesterone attaches to receptors.

Hormones: Substances produced by organs or cells in your body that affect bodily processes. Estrogen and progesterone are examples.

I

Intramuscular injection: An injection given into the muscle.

L

Loading dose: A large initial dose of a substance or a series of such doses given to rapidly achieve a therapeutic concentration in the body.

Locally advanced breast cancer: Cancer that has spread from where it started in the breast to nearby tissue or lymph nodes, but not to other parts of the body.

M

Metastatic breast cancer: Also referred to as stage IV breast cancer; cancer that has spread from the breast to other parts of the body, such as the bones, liver, lungs, or brain.

P

Postmenopausal: Refers to the time after menopause. Menopause is when you have permanently stopped having menstrual periods.

Progression-free survival: The length of time during and after the treatment of a disease, such as cancer, that a patient lives with the disease but it does not get worse. In a clinical trial, measuring progression-free survival is one way to see how well a new treatment works. Also called PFS.

Progesterone: A hormone that is important in menstruation and fertility. It may affect the growth of some breast cancers (those that are determined to be progesterone receptor positive).

S

Soft tissue: Refers to muscle, fat, fibrous tissue, blood vessels, or other supporting tissue of the body.

V

Visceral: Soft internal organs of the body, including the lungs, the heart, and the organs of the digestive, excretory, reproductive, and circulatory systems.

FASLODEX is a prescription medicine used to treat: hormone receptor (HR)-positive breast cancer in women who have gone through menopause whose disease has spread after treatment with antiestrogen medicine, OR HR-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative breast cancer whose disease has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic) in combination with palbociclib in women with disease progression after hormonal therapy.

When FASLODEX is used in combination with palbociclib, please also see the palbociclib Patient Information.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION: You should not receive FASLODEX if you have had an allergic reaction to any of the ingredients in FASLODEX. Symptoms of an allergic reaction to FASLODEX may include: itching; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat; trouble breathing

 IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

  • You should not receive FASLODEX if you have had an allergic reaction to any of the ingredients in FASLODEX. Symptoms of an allergic reaction to FASLODEX may include: itching; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat; trouble breathing
  • Before receiving FASLODEX, tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you:

  • Have a low level of platelets in your blood or bleed easily. Especially tell your healthcare provider if you take a blood thinner medicine (anticoagulants)
  • Have liver problems
  • Are pregnant or plan to become pregnant, as FASLODEX can harm your unborn baby. Females who are able to become pregnant should use effective birth control during treatment with FASLODEX and for one year after the last dose. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you become pregnant or think you are pregnant while on FASLODEX
  • Are breast-feeding or plan to breast-feed. It is not known if FASLODEX passes into breast milk. Do not breast-feed during treatment with FASLODEX and for one year after the last dose. Talk to your healthcare provider about the best way to feed your baby during this time
  • FASLODEX is administered as a shot into the muscle of your buttock.

    FASLODEX may cause injection site related nerve damage. Call your healthcare provider if you develop any of the following symptoms in your legs following a FASLODEX injection: numbness; tingling; weakness.

    The most common side effects of FASLODEX include: injection site pain; nausea; muscle, joint, and bone pain; headache; tiredness; hot flashes; vomiting; loss of appetite; weakness; cough; shortness of breath, constipation; and increased liver enzymes.

    Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effect that bothers you or does not go away. These are not all of the possible side effects with FASLODEX. For more information, ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist.

Approved Uses for FASLODEX

FASLODEX is a prescription medicine used to treat:

  • hormone receptor (HR)-positive breast cancer in women who have gone through menopause whose disease has spread after treatment with antiestrogen medicine, OR
  • HR-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative breast cancer whose disease has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic) in combination with palbociclib in women with disease progression after hormonal therapy

When FASLODEX is used in combination with palbociclib, please also see the palbociclib Patient Information.

Please see FASLODEX Prescribing Information with Patient Information.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.FDA.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

If you would like additional information regarding AstraZeneca products, please contact the Information Center at AstraZeneca in the United States at 1-800-236-9933, Monday through Friday, 8 AM to 6 PM ET, excluding holidays.

This site is intended for US consumers only.

The information on this Web site should not take the place of talking with your doctor or health care professional. If you have any questions about your condition, or if you would like more information about FASLODEX, talk to your doctor or pharmacist. Only you and your health care professional can decide if FASLODEX is right for you.